What Are Soap Brows And Why You Need To Try This Secret Cult Technique

When high and sharp arches dominated the eyebrow trend back in the ‘00s, eyebrow pencils were the hit product to have. Then, came the natural and thick eyebrows like the ones of Cara Delevingne and Lily Collins’ that called for eyebrow gels.

But among all these trendy brow techniques, there’s one that was loved by many celebrity makeup artists yet rarely mentioned: soap brows.

 

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You might have heard of or seen the term in makeup tutorials or Instagram captions recently, and that’s because it’s making its grand return into the beauty trend once again! Although we’ve spotted several makeup artists and Instagram posts mentioning the term, what does soap brows actually mean?

Adopting the same concept of eyebrow gels, soap brows are exactly what it sounds like: using bar soap in replacement of eyebrow gels. While it may seem like a useless substitute, some makeup artists actually prefer using bar soap because of its stronger hold on the hair, simplicity and affordability. Not to mention, it doesn’t darken the brows like how eyebrow gels do.

 

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In case you’re not convinced, Swedish makeup artist Linda Hallberg, eyebrow artist Robin EvansRihanna’s makeup artist Priscilla Ono and beauty Youtuber Tina Yong are a few who had jumped onto the trend. So how exactly do you do soap brows?

The effortless and no-brainer technique requires only two tools: a clean spoolie brush and a bar of soap. Simply wet your spoolie brush, rub it on the bar soap to pick up the formula and do it like how you would with eyebrow gels. Pay attention not to go overboard with rubbing the spoolie brush on the soap or it might start foaming up.

 

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Compared to eyebrow gels, soap brows don’t add any depth or intensity to the brows. Instead, the base is barer to give you more leverage to fill in the strokes yourself.

And of course, not all bar soaps make the cut to be used on your eyebrows. Linda shares that she uses Muji Bath Soap to avoid casting hairs with white residue but you can certainly make do with glycerine-based soaps that are transparent. Otherwise, West Barn Co.’s Soap Brow Kit is a good choice as it’s specifically formulated to be used for that purpose.

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